Basement Renovation

Very best way to insulate a basement





Very best way to insulate a basement.

35 comments

  1. No, foam board will not stop moisture build-up on the wall. There is still an air gap between the wall and the pink board. You need to use closed-cell spray foam. That is the only thing that will prevent mold/moisture behind the barrier.

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  2. great job,,i just lost 3-4 inches of space on the wall and floor,,,lol smh

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  3. Mike Holmes you should've used Floodsill as a water-impermeable base plate prior to putting down ANYTHING on those walls. In this case – where does the water run to when (not if, but WHEN) a leak occurs? Right on that wood… oh, ah… mold.

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  4. How much does the pink stuff cost

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  5. Its a good idea for the walls only. frame a wall in front of it, insulate with roxul insulation which is very fire resistant.The floor is a terrible idea. You can always put a product like DMX one step which doesnt even require a osb or plywood installed over it for laminate or engineered hardwood. Also has an R rating. and would cost a fraction of the cost of this and take half the time.

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  6. Just wondering what happens when you get to the bottom of the stairs and you have raised the floor by 1 inch with the foam then another 5/8 with the plywood, now your bottom step into the basement is that much off and would be awkward?

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  7. Hey Mike you should tape your balls and spray foam up your ass!
    Still got leakage?

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  8. that pink panels on the floor is not structural you cant use that on the floor!!

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  9. good

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  10. Poor hoe owner… It looks over killed for no good reason. Probably inviting more problems for future.

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  11. The "science" behind the idea is that the moisture (not condensation) will move to the outside of the foundation wall which is breathable. The foam creates a thermal break which does not allow the hot and cold to meet between the foundation and the foam (condensation). It is important to fully seal all joints to prevent ANY airflow in behind the foam. That is why he is emphasizing that. If not sealed fully airflow would create movement for warm/cool air (creating condensation).

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  12. @vanwahlgren mn,h

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  13. That tuck tape peels off over time. not designed for XPS. plus with the ship laps, not necessary even when used as a vapor barrier. Anyone ever take the time to read manufacturer instructions?

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  14. there are many more ways for moisture to form, not just from hot/cold air meeting.

    Concrete wicks moisture from the dirt below it, and concrete itself contains water that slowly "cures" over many years and this is why concrete itself "sweats"

    Walls made of wood (wood foundations of treated wood) contain moisture that slowly dries out, and regular lumber has some moisture also.

    Furthermore, no "vapor barrier" is a barrier at all. Every staple hole will leak moist air into the wall.

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  15. I agree with you there. I foamed my walls, but not floor.

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  16. The idea is to put the polystyrene behind the stud to prevent condesation where hot and cold meet. The studs, paper on the batt insullation, and drywall paper are food for mold in wet enviroments. I created a cooler effect and then studded, batt insulation without paper, then drywall. NO vapor barrier.

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  17. I put a perimeter drain around my basement inside. I have never seen polystyrene with mold on it. If it is airtight, you do not have hot and cold air meeting to form condesation. If you have leaking walls, that is a whole other problem that should be addressed before you insulate.

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  18. Spray foam does a good job, until you have problems with trapped moisture. This has happened in many cases. As a general rule, breath ability is always a better option. The other problem with foam is that it is extremely difficult to remove in order to access areas behind the foam, or to remove the foam when it coats with mold.

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  19. Foam traps moisture between the concrete and the foam, it has nowhere to go, and it support the growth of mold. The very best insulation will provide the wall to "breathe" This technique is asking for trouble. Mold and rot can pass right through the foam and infect occupants.

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  20. Way to go Mike.. Keep up good work…

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  21. He installs the products that sponsor gave him to install. It's all commercial B-S

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  22. This is out of control. Foam on the floor is wrong and rediculous. Use dricore for the floor and foam boards for the walls. Com'n man!

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  23. @jeffpicks PT should be used when installing direct on concrete… if your using the Mike method in this vid, then no… regular 2 x 4 will do.

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  24. @HomeEnergyNow Damn, are you still ranting about this subject?!! I let you have the last word, yet you still have to reply with BS!! Get a life dude!! BTW, loosefills in walls settle over time. Get an IR camera and look around at some walls filled with loosefill. It DOES NOT go to the top anymore. May be good for open attic where you can pile it high. Spray foam has more R Value per inch. Cellulose loose is 3.2 – 3.8 per inch. Closed cell spray is 6 – 7.

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  25. @HomeEnergyNow spoken like a typical know-it-all american asshole

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  26. @alibahry Season 5 – Episode EP5057: Bargain Basement

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  27. just have a shit load of towel raidiators around the room

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  28. @HomeEnergyNow oh my, what a big brain you have there.

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  29. @alibahry Its Episode 5 of season 5. Theres the whole episode on youtube (4 parts). Look for DrDRutherford's Channel… hes got it up there.

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  30. i was thinking that way also but seeing those spray foam right on the concrete then maybe he's right.

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  31. @HomeEnergyNow
    Well .. if you are really a "home energy professional", you should know that you first have to consider the region where the client is. Mike Holmes is in the Toronto area usually; which means winter, snow, -40C, etc. Therefore, the heatloss in the basement could be around 30% if not well insulated. As an engineer (I'm not the only one), I would recommend this setup if you live in a cold area (i.e. if you've only seen snow on TV, this is not for you).

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  32. just because he is confident doesn't make him right. 18-23 bucks for each 2×8 piece holms is a nut…. i don't even agree with this method anyways we will see if it proves it self or not… to many variables to say this is what you should do in your basement.

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  33. For natural insulation solutions home owners will find WEKA wool panels more interesting

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  34. this is retarded. You will get loads of moisture trapped between the foam and concrete. Holmes got retarded here. You should use drycore subflooring (5/8 OSB or plywood if you preffer with plastic spacing sheet glued on one side to raise the wood at least 3/8 off the concrete) Also when framing the walls there should be a 1'' air gap between the concrete and wood framing and insulation so that if water seeps in there is ventilation for drying. Tack tar paper onto the walls prior to framing.

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  35. The largest benefit of spray foam is as an air sealer. Batt insulation will not perform well if it is being wind washed due to inadequate air sealing.

    Typical sheathing is 1 perm.. Dow blue foam is 1.5 perms (I assume the pink is comparable). The foam is less of a vapor barrier than the plywood.

    The problem with most of these jobs is the basement was not designed to be finished and the appropriate barriers were not installed. You can't make chicken soup out of chicken shit.

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