Waterproofing

Interior Drainage Method for Diy Basement Waterproofing





Interior Drainage System for Do-it-yourself Basement Waterproofing

This movie displays the approach of setting up an inside drainage system in a basement. The products price tag was about $1100 and 60-80 hrs of function. Remember to enable me know if you have any inquiries.

Below is the link to the products I employed:

Fantastic Luck!

resource

37 comments

  1. almost 4 yrs later, how has it held up?

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  2. Does it work?

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  3. That looks like a ton of work for a "hack" kind of solution. A "hack" should be easy. For a hack, I would go with the suggestion someone made in the comments… make a dam that runs parallel to the wall. Epoxy, or pond-and-stone foam, or hydraulic cement, not sure which would be best… just trap the water between the wall and your dam and let it flow to the sump pump. For a non-hack solution, if you are planning on finishing the basement, isn't French drain really the only way (inside or outside)?

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  4. Damn I give look like I will dishes out 6k 😞😧😦😦😢😢😢

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  5. Mortar joints. Need to drill them as well or just wasting your time and money.

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  6. That's a great video. Nice, quality work. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTII-J5fvIvuTQyJKRB1mNA?view_as=subscriber

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  7. This is a joke! Your floor is still going to get wet never mind the on going mould build up. Don’t do this!

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  8. thanks very informative especially the economics

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  9. OMG that's my basement

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  10. This would be great if water was pouring from your walls. The issue is its coming from the foundation and the ground. Should have dug down to the foundation to install this.

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  11. Not!!!

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  12. Please do a favor to viewers and yourself and delete this video. There are too many wrong things I do not know where to start.

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  13. There's NO SUCH WORD as "acrosst"! Who the fuck talks like that? Never took an English class, huh?

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  14. Great Video. Seriously considering this. 1) Has it been successful? 2) I think it's an optical illusion, but there is not a big gap between the slab and the wall, right) 3) was the grinder used on the slab to remove debris, etc? On the concrete ? 4) what kind of epoxy do I buy? 5) this rascal lays flat, but when water gets into it, it flows naturally toward the sump pump? I Like Your Screename. Thanks in advance. I hope you see this soon. I plan to act right away. The basement size is identical too. I'm so glad you gave and idea of cost of DIY vs Another firm. VERY HELPFUL.

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  15. Doesn't this kind of system need a pitch, so that gravity takes the water to the sump pump instead of the water just sitting there?

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  16. Did this actually keep your basement dry?

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  17. good job my friend , thank you for good video advise

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  18. Won't work

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  19. 9:34 wait what?

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  20. Is this the home where you were breeding mosquitoes in the basement?

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  21. This video is from 2015. How is the system holding up? any leakage or sealant failure? How about an up to date review of the system.

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  22. Thanks I like this,
    What about a clay tile wall tho. My house is old can you still drill the holes ?

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  23. Thanks for i am Tilak chauhan water proofing specialist and my phone number is 9303306671

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  24. Excellent video, I am in the process of evaluating all options for a similar problem in my basement in Virginia. All quotes for interior drain are $5-6k and exterior drain are $11-15k. This seems like a very good option at an amazingly low cost. Would you be able to provide any feedback on how things are now with this system and if given a chance, would you do it all over again. Thanks

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  25. This is the lazy fix

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  26. You need an interior French drain system. That shit won’t for long

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  27. How does this system handle a change in height (step up). I have a room in my basement that is 8 inches elevated from the main area? Thanks

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  28. 1. Never chip towards your body, especially when you can chip away.
    2. Use the proper equipment, a cold chisel should be used with an appropriate hammer, not a claw hammer meant for driving nails.

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  29. lol, 1100 …

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  30. Every spring, I get quite a bit of water that pools in my basement, especially behind my furnace and hot water heater, which are sitting on top of a 4" concrete slab I installed. My sump pump is located toward the center of my basement floor and does a pretty good job of removing the standing water, however, since the floor is lower near the furnace and hot water heater, it does not drain into the sump pump properly. I don't know if this product would work in my basement, but it was interesting to watch the video. If anyone has any suggestions about how I could eliminate the pooling water in my basement, I would appreciate it!

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  31. I just got an estimate from Ohio State Waterproofing for $20,000. My house is only 1200sq ft, built in 1930. I have 2 walls bowing in. I was told I have to replace the walls for an additional $15,000. I was blown away. I might do what you did here. Alot of good comments here positive and negative.

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  32. Most company quotes include cost for laborers including insurance, as well as the equipment they use making the job go easier and faster and any other costs such as fuel for a generator to power certain hydraulic equipment using an portable hydraulic gas or diesel powerpack and the cost for the stuff you showed and used such as the drainage and sump and well bin. And for a more proper water drain system for a basement made of cmu or concrete masonry units with their failure prone aspects such as water and if not reinforced with rebar and fill in certain points to prevent ground pressure related failures.

    As a Former experienced waterpoofing pro this system imo has a few failure prone points, one being not sufficient drainage for larger amounts of water inflow and the silicone or other sealant for the outer edge, I have looked at the design of both this and level 1 DUY system and both allow for acces to check for and clear any blockages. The best system is if there is more severe water intrusion would be to dig out the outside of the wall where most water intrusion occurs and check for cracks if no membrane or dimple drain was applied at time of construction, Then clean and apply crack filler epoxy, then a peel and stick membrane and if your property has water retention then add a gravel pit along the wall in the area and also dimple board over the membrane to allow water to flow down along the outside of said wall to collect into the gravel drain, But still have a channel drain inside as such to allow for any water than does get inside to be collected and removed conveniently.

    Exposed concrete is like a sponge, it will suck up water like a sandbag wall and retain it until it evaporates either into the home or seep back into the soil. Thus why these days it is recommended in new construction or reconstruction to add a gravel and cloth covered perforated pipe to collect and remove saturated or excess water and as mentioned membrane outside the wall with dimple 'board' to allow proper water drainage along the outside. For the interior you want to ad a channel system that gets embedded into the concrete floor along with foam board for insulation and a moisture barrier below the insulation to protects it and to keep ground water from getting siphoned up by the concrete. The reason for a channel (preferably one you can open up for inspection and cleaning as necessary) along the wall with sump well and pump is to allow interior moisture build up or the likelihood that goodness forbid the water pipe or worse yet the sewage/sewer pipe was to fail and leak then the passive floor drainage will allow the water at least a place to drain away, as for waste that will cause blockage of the channel and cleaning of it as well. Another benefit is in the rare event of a flash or other natural flood water that gets into the basement to be collected and removed, there is three ways to dispose of the water one is the leech field on the property, another is connected to flow out into the sewer system (Not the septic system!) or a pond or river if one is nearby s long as it is mostly clean water, lastly the storm drains are also another outflow option if the town or city or district allows/permits.

    If you live in a constant enough flood zone or plain, you are better off getting the house raised and placed on pilings/stilts, which is a more costly option and not a very DIY friendly or easy nor low cost choice, and would negate or remove the below grade basement option. IMO I prefer the ICF foundation, its easy enough like a pour in place formwork but without the added time and cost for formwork installation and removal along with the 'rental' of said formwork added cost while it is being utilized. Seeing as the insulating form both acts as the formwork and once concrete was poured and set after a few days the rest of the work can continue and only need to apply a stick and peel membrane of choice and even a dimple board drain as well for better waterflow along with airflow for radon prevention where as with exposed concrete would require added time to insulate as desired on the inside, With either monolithic type wall basement you would want to still do all said exterior and interior drainage systems for redundancy but as for ICF on the inside, I would use a new form to have exposed interior for craxk inspection but the outside would be thick 4 inch insulation which would be more than enough insulation and still finish either leaving the wood used for the form in pace and applying drywall/plasterboard over for paint or wallpaper finish if not some other fancy wall covering.

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  33. This video should be filed under “comedy”.

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  34. Is there epoxy only on the bottom

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  35. Please Delete this. You are giving people the wrong idea. Thank you.

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  36. It seems you would save more by drilling the holes and making an epoxy dam around the perimeter and creating a slope to the sump for ease of maintenance. In my basement all the seepage flows to the sump in the center of the floor.

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  37. How about if your basement is all rock

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