Waterproofing

Waterproofing – Flashing a Concrete Slab To Porch





In this Rogue episode, Matt will demonstrate you a technique to watertight this incredibly tough changeover among a wall and flat concrete slab.

The Build Demonstrates Instagram –

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25 comments

  1. What should we do if the window/doors have already been installed but not on the stainless metal sheet?? Do you have any suggestion please?

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  2. Hi I have a concrete front porch with slate all around the edge how do I water proof it water is going down to basement.

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  3. Thank you so much for this video. I have a existing house that is at the same leave as the porch. It needs to be redone like this.

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  4. Awesome tip with the cut concrete and the inlayed flashing! Thanks

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  5. Hey quick ? I know nothing about this but I got crack in my side walk and water coming into my basement I wonder if u could help with how to fix this just bought the house

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  6. if you really have that much water load potential maybe some sort of a covered porch slab wall perimeter drain would lower the anxiety of keeping the inside dry.

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  7. More time on this one with some talking about how the flashing works in the corner and against the door end. I'd watch every second even if it was twice as long!

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  8. Level transitions between inside and out are also really helpful to people with mobility impairments. As the population ages it helps people using walkers and wheelchairs most of all.

    I wish you'd been able to show us more details here. Are the interior and exterior slabs separate pours and thermally broken? From the video it looks like a gap of several inches between the upturned lip of the pan and the interior edge of the door threshold. What will fill that space?

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  9. How does the threshold of the door interact with the upturned lip of the stainless steel pan? Thanks!

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  10. Thats awesome! Very thorough and thinking ahead! I like it! Any issues with aluminium on stainless? I guess they are insulated between them?

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  11. Just plain stupid why let water go under window frame at all. Would be better to attach that upturn lip against window frame with few self tapping screw and maybe put some caulking between that joint.

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  12. This video is great but….it really could use more cow bell

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  13. That is a thing of beauty.

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  14. Great detail! Keep up the good work.

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  15. Water and houses dont mix.

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  16. Very nice. What sealant did you use to waterproof the kerf cut?

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  17. Would have liked to see the detail at the corner as well, where the stainless steel pans meet.

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  18. Short answer: be wealthy enough to afford a new lake house.

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  19. Real nice! Would have loved to see the construction of it before the plates were installed, to get a better understanding for it. Thanks for the great videos!

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  20. Interesting concept Matt. Here, the norm is to just throw towels on the porch in heavy rains.

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  21. Valuable TIP Matt. Going To Have To Remember This One.

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  22. Matt, was that a field change/decision, or was it routed back to the architects to detail and draft? Great channel – keep it up! And PLEASE put your hats on your merch site!!! 😀

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  23. Matt, here's a solution I just thought of. Could you do something similar to a linear drain that are used for indoor showers? Basically, have a drain that spans one foot from each side of the door located underneath the door/window. Then the bottom of the window/door could actually be recessed and be totally flush with the floor for a true zero threshold.

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  24. Great solution!

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  25. It is all about the QUALITY….
    Keep up the good work!!!

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