Bathroom Remodeling

DIY How To Install Copper To Pex Shower and Bath Plumbing





How did this project turn out? WATCH HERE: DIY your own …

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49 comments

  1. Sharkbites are for people who don’t know to do real plumbing it’s only supposed to be for temporary purposes

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  2. I always use yellow teflon tape and pipe dope and have never had a leak. An old pipefitter taught me that trick.

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  3. Thanks for the vid very helpful. Also like the 70s porn music! ✌🏻🇺🇸

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  4. Won’t pass inspection on most usa municipalities

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  5. Man you are the best I learned a lot from your video I become a better handyman because you everytime I have something and I don’t know how to do it I seach for and you have the answer
    Thank you a lot

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  6. Turn the water on!!!! Just finished my shower. Tub removal etc…. all concrete!!! So easy with a house made of wood and drywall.

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  7. Will a 3/4 inch pex be enough for a water supply from a shallow well. Dont really have more then one tap etc going at once.

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  8. Hey Jeff, pex tubing for a tub spout drop is generally considered a no no isn't it? I made that mistake a while back, the end result was the tub spout didn't work. I had to replace it with copper and it then worked fine. If you buy a Delta shower faucet the installation manual will specifically tell you NOT to use pex for the tub spout drop. I'm curious if this set up you did here worked. I'm sure it did, you probably know something I don't. On a lighter note your video was a huge help to me just to revisit the procedure for a shower valve install, which I completed easily going from copper to pex. So thanks for all of your great videos.

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  9. Great vid, but why the 70’s porn soundtrack?

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  10. Jeff: I have an unusual situation where I've discovered two 1/2" copper pipes in a bathroom wall that have been capped off. I would like to install a shower with pex piping similar to what you've shown here and am confident I can do so without hiring a licensed plumber. Would these capped pipes count as an "existing feature" that I don't need permitted? My city's code mentions you can modify and existing feature without a permit or license. Thank you!

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  11. good but does not take time to explain well for beginners

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  12. That fitting is also called wing back 90

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  13. Instead of using the clamps to be tightened with the pliers can you use those with the bolt to be tightened with a wrench?

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  14. Home depot and lowes have this type of value only for special order

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  15. I’m not hating or talking shit but he had the channel locks the wrong direction when he was tightening the fittings in the valve body. Not to mention he wraps Teflon on the threads the hard way. Right direction but takes longer. I did agree with him using Teflon and pipe dope. I do the same on fittings in pain in the ass spots

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  16. The best pex system is wirsbo. Their is no flow restrictions like their is with most pex systems.

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  17. Tile setter here: I address water damage for a living. I’m all about the new school but frankly this type of plumbing is basically a time bomb. Hose clamps and plastic tubing are fine on an engine, they have no place in modern plumbing. This stuff leaks behind the waterproofing, directly into your wall studs and down into your floor. Hire a professional and get proper soldered copper connections. It’s a little more expensive, but not as expensive as the bill you’ll pay in five years when the leaking clamps have started to destroy your house.

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  18. Big mistake the shower head, fixture, and spout not aligned i dont see you take a look seem crooked omg🤣🤣😒😒😒😒😒😒😒

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  19. Muy bien esplicado no todos te dicen paso apaso

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  20. Don't use PEX supplying the tub spout, its to restrictive and will cause water to come out of the shower head. I learned the hard way and had to remove tile to fix the problem. Use copper or a 1/2' brass nipple if you don't know how to sweat copper. I definitely don't use Shark Bite inside of walls.

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  21. How do I know what size my copper pipe is? We are going to put in the Shower Tower (because it is sexy, Lol) and are converting to pex. Not sure if our copper plumbing is 1/2 or 3/4".

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  22. jamais de pex 1/2 pour le bec du bain…quand tu va ouvrir l'eau ca va sortir par en haut aussi…..et tes channel lock tu les utilise a l'envers et tu serais mieux avec un wescut

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  23. Please learn how to use those channel locks! Other than that your videos are great.

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  24. My I have the valve brand name or model number ? Which trim kit suitable ?

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  25. I hate how he does threads
    There's a way better way

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  26. Thanks for the video. Basically what I was planning, except I was hoping for a shark bite/press-n-lock fitting for the shower valve. Not to be a troll, but why are you using the channel locks backward?

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  27. Piping the tub spout with 1/2" pex will always cause your shower head to drip. Use 3/4 pex or 1/2" copper

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  28. Hello, i have seen you use crimps and ring clamps for pex, what do you recommend the most?

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  29. Thank you man now I know I can tackle my renovation.

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  30. Traditionally, I find that things are not being designed up to snuff. Manufacturers are cutting corners in the amount of copper or brass in their fittings / valves, and hence make poor design choices. Part of it is our fault, as we won't pay for a slightly better design, but want the cheapest item out there. Sigh.

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  31. It is called a drop ear because of the little tabs (ears) for screwing it to the wall.

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  32. Those rings are not up to code.
    Your not supposed to use that for this type of plumbing.

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  33. In this set up do you have a video showing how to attach your tub spout to that drop down you used?

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  34. I'm swapping out a two handle ancient set up for a single lever mix valve. Only issue is that the 2 X 6 stud runs dead center up the wall, right where I need to mount the valve so it's not off to the side and looking like a disaster. Any videos on how work around that??

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  35. love your videos. They inspire me to do my own job. Do we lose water pressure/flow since the ID of 1/2 pex fitting seems lot less than 1/2 copper pipe fittings?

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  36. You're teflon tape roll facing the wrong way drives me nuts.

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  37. When Installing A Kitchen Sink, What Height Should The Main Drainage Pipe Be From The Floor

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  38. I have nothing against sharkbites and pex clamps, except inside walls

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  39. Cam someone explain what the copper studs coming off the supply lines are for? Can they be removed?

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  40. As usual, taking things apart are always overlooked as it is also where we ALL begin 🙂 Can you explain how to take the "rings" apart. Just in case I screw something up, and I always screw something up.?

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  41. Almost every manufacturer of shower valves prohibit the use of PEX from the valve to the tub spout. The inner diameter of the pipe is too small and will actually divert a small amount of water up to the shower head while the tub spout is open. They recommend either soldered copper or threaded brass pipe. I have repaired far too many DIY jobs where the homeowner or handyman has used PEX down to the tub spout causing a trickle of water from the shower head while the tub is filling.

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  42. OL DIRTY BASTARD!

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  43. the hoses/tubes they use here in west Europa are fixed via crimp-able couplings, you need a hydraulic crimp-tool to press-fit the hose. no need for such rings.

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  44. The idea is fast, but what happens in 5-10 years when the crimp leaks behind your beautiful tiles. On a copper line you could simply solder the the leaked area and not damage the entire bath wall

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  45. Easy to understand. I would suggest just using one pipe sealant. One of the sealants main functions, is to provide lubrication, which allows a better interference fit of the threads. The threads are designed to do the majority of the sealing. If you use Teflon tape, two wraps is plenty, as there is virtually zero clearance between the male an female threads, other than at the gaps between the crest and root of the threads. Using to much TT can prevent the threads from mating properly, and all of the excess Teflon needs to go somewhere. Which is usually at the top of the female fitting. I do prefer the paste, except that it should be given time to set.

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  46. Hey Jeff, I'm reading that the tub spout should not be Pex but copper piping due to the pressure.

    I am half way through my remodel and just installed the Pex plumbing identical to your video above. The plumbing will be behind a wall.

    Still ok to use Pex (with crimp connectors?

    Thanks!

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  47. I don't think this guy is a licensed plumber, using the channel locks backwards and rolling the teflon tape backwards.

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  48. you are holding the Chanel lock pliers wrong way

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  49. legally have to use copper behind the wall — no?

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